Nov 15, 2014

Oct 29, 2014

Report: Pharma companies have many apps, relatively few downloads

Pharmaceutical companies have a lot of apps in the market, and have been making apps for a long time, but their apps aren’t seeing downloads and usage on par with the apps from other industries. That’s the conclusion of a new report from Research2Guidance (R2G), which analyzed more than 725 apps from 11 pharma companies. […]



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Oct 24, 2014

Understand neuroscience with these neat animations by Harvard University

Understand neuroscience with these neat animations by Harvard University


When I first heard of Harvard's Fundamentals of Neuroscience online course, I thought it was going to be so hard to understand that I would have a seizure before the end of the first video. But no, thanks to the cool and straightforward animation it is actually very easy to get it.


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Oct 7, 2014

How Much Coffee You Need Is a Genetic Trait

How Much Coffee You Need Is a Genetic Trait


For some, three double espressos is barely enough to get them out of bed; for others, the whiff of weak latte is enough to have them jittering. Now, it turns out that those differing reactions are genetic.


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Sep 8, 2014

All we know about one of the strangest objects in the Universe

All we know about one of the strangest objects in the Universe


Neutron stars. They are so strange that we can barely wrap our heads around the idea of their existence. In fact, we still don't really know most things about them, so we can only guess and wonder trying to explain their extreme properties. This video explains all we know—or suppose—about them.


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Sep 5, 2014

Create Customizable GeoMaps with Google Sheets

Create Customizable GeoMaps with Google Sheets


If you want to display a range of data by region, you need a GeoMap. You may not have known this, but it's quite easy to create your own in Google Sheets after entering your data.


Highlight the data and go to Insert > Charts. On the charts tab of the new window you can select maps and choose which type of map you want. On the customize tab you can choose the colors and select which region you want. I created a map for the U.S., but you can choose to create a map for the world instead, or a select number of other regions.


6 Powerful Google Drive Features You're Probably Not Using | PC World






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May 14, 2014

The Most Common Two Minute Emails You Can Deal With Right Away

The Most Common Two Minute Emails You Can Deal With Right Away


According to GTD methodology , if something takes you less than two minutes, you should do it immediately—any more, and it goes on your to-do list. Here are some of the most common two-minute emails that you can spot from their subject line.


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May 6, 2014

Google Stars leak reveals a new way to share and search your bookmarks

Google+ expert Florian Kiersch recently revealed that Google's testing a bookmarking app called "Stars," and he's just posted a video (embedded below) showing how it might work. The initial leak exposed how you could star web pages from Chrome's...



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Apr 21, 2014

Electronic Monocle Uses Biofeedback to Track Your Favorite Websites

Electronic Monocle Uses Biofeedback to Track Your Favorite Websites


The internet is a fire hydrant of content. Keeping track of the pages you enjoy is a pain. A team of UK design students has a conceptual solution: Amoeba, an electronic monocle that files away the pages you find most interesting, as measured by your biofeedback response. It's the emotion-tracking Google Glass you always wanted!


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Apr 17, 2014

Police Are Testing a "Live Google Earth" To Watch Crime As It Happens


In Compton last year, police began quietly testing a system that allowed them to do something incredible: Watch every car and person in real time as they ebbed and flowed around the city. Every assault, every purse snatched, every car speeding away was on record—all thanks to an Ohio company that monitors cities from the air.


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Apr 16, 2014

Google Looked Into Space Elevator, Hoverboards, and Teleportation

An anonymous reader writes "Google has a huge research budget and an apparent willingness to take on huge projects. They've gotten themselves into autonomous cars, fiber optic internet, robotics, and Wi-Fi balloons. But that raises a question: if they're willing to commit to projects as difficult and risk as those, what projects have they explored but rejected? Several of the scientists working at Google's 'innovation lab' have spilled the beans: '[Mag-lev] systems have a stabilizing structure that keeps trains in place as they hover and move forward in only one direction. That couldn't quite translate into an open floor plan of magnets that keep a hoverboard steadily aloft and free to move in any direction. One problem, as Piponi explains, is that magnets tend to keep shifting polarities, so your hoverboard would constantly flip over as you floated around moving from a state of repulsion to attraction with the magnets. Any skateboarder could tell you what that means: Your hoverboard would suck. ... If scaling problems are what brought hoverboards down to earth, material-science issues crashed the space elevator. The team knew the cable would have to be exceptionally strong-- "at least a hundred times stronger than the strongest steel that we have," by Piponi's calculations. He found one material that could do this: carbon nanotubes. But no one has manufactured a perfectly formed carbon nanotube strand longer than a meter. And so elevators "were put in a deep freeze," as Heinrich says, and the team decided to keep tabs on any advances in the carbon nanotube field.'"

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Apr 2, 2014

Computers Are Now Able to Teach Each Other Pac-Man, The End is Near

Computers Are Now Able to Teach Each Other Pac-Man, The End is Near


Until now, humans have had one significant advantage over computers and robots: We meatbags were the only ones who could teach them how to function. Now, researchers at Washington State University have created computers that can teach other computers. And they're using Pac-Man to do it. Is nothing sacred?


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Mar 14, 2014

Health researchers see unique opportunity in self-tracker data

As the number of self-tracking health and fitness tools available to consumers continues to climb, a persistent question has been whether the data they collect might be useful to health researchers. Along with that: Are people who self-track comfortable sharing their data with researchers? A new, must-read report from San Diego’s California Institute for Telecommunications [...]



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Feb 19, 2014

Skyhigh Debuts CloudRisk, A Tool To Help Large Companies Track Their Cloud Exposure

Screen Shot 2014-02-18 at 5.10.37 PMSkyhigh Networks today debuted CloudRisk, a new tool to help corporations track and manage their potential risk due to use of cloud services. CloudRisk is a dashboard that tracks a firm's current surface area with cloud services, providing the company with a number -- on a scale of one through 10 -- regarding their current exposure and a comparable figure for their industry.



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Feb 8, 2014

Big Pharma Presses US To Quash Cheap Drug Production In India

An anonymous reader writes "Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA), are leaning on the United States government to discourage India from allowing the production and sale of affordable generic drugs to treat diseases such as cancer, diabetes, HIV/AIDS and hepatitis. India is currently on the U.S. government's Priority Watch List — countries whose practices on protecting intellectual property Washington believes should be monitored closely. Last year Novartis lost a six-year legal battle after the Indian Supreme court ruled that small changes and improvements to the drug Glivec did not amount to innovation deserving of a patent. Western drugmakers Pfizer, GlaxoSmithKline, Novartis, Roche Holding, Sanofi, and others have a bigger share of the fast-growing drug market in India. But they have been frustrated by a series of decisions on patents and pricing, as part of New Delhi's push to increase access to life-saving treatments in a place where only 15 percent of 1.2 billion people are covered by health insurance. One would certainly understand and probably agree with the need for for cheaper drugs. But don't forget that big pharma, for all its problems still is the number one creator of new drugs. In 2012 alone, the U.S. government and private companies spent a combined $130 billion (PDF) on medical research."

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Feb 4, 2014

Trouble With Your Code? AirPair Connects You Live With Expert Programmers

Learning the fundamentals of programming is easy. But becoming an expert? That’s damn hard. There are a million and one languages, each with their own nuances, strengths, and weaknesses. Worse yet, the programming hype train is always chugging away; just when you think you’ve mastered the world’s greatest language, everyone will be talking up some […]



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Jan 29, 2014

Use YouTube for Instant and Free Transcription


Use YouTube for Instant and Free Transcription


Most of us don't need to transcribe audio too often, which means that paying for a service is generally out of the question. If you just need to do it once and you're not terribly concerned with accuracy, Andy Baio suggests using YouTube's built-in captioning system.







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Jan 27, 2014

Scientists film how the brain makes memories for the first time ever


Scientists film how the brain makes memories for the first time ever


For the first time in history, scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have captured how our brain makes memories in video, watching how molecules morph into the structures that, at the end of the day, make who we are. If there's a soul, this how it gets made.







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Jan 25, 2014

Jan 14, 2014

Man spams App Store for fun and makes $2800 in profit

Gabriel Machuret is not an app developer, in fact he "couldn't care less about apps." He looks at an app and doesn't see a coding challenge or an opportunity for creativity, he sees a revenue stream. He's an App Store Optimization (ASO) expert, and ...



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Jan 9, 2014

Where the hell did they put the camera in this awesome ski jump video?


Where the hell did they put the camera in this awesome ski jump video?


Ski jumping is pretty cool when you watch it from the outside, but check out this short of Anders Jacobsen training in Lillehammer, Norway, filmed with a camera hanging right in front of his face. The perspective in this real-time video is pretty awesome. But where the hell is the camera?







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Jan 7, 2014

Sony's Life space UX projector can squeeze a 147-inch 4K screen in a small space

You can tell the veterans from the young upstarts at CES simply by how they announce products. Simply putting a new device on stage and feeding you specs is pretty much amateur hour. (Though, it does make the lives of tech journalists much easier.) ...



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